Aug Insights

The Care of Our Time
Benjamin Franklin once challenged a friend,  “Dost thou love life? Then do not squander time, for that is the stuff life is made of.”  You’ll love your time more once you realize how much of it you are wasting. Start buying back some of the only resource you can’t buy more of by considering whether the routines that dominate your life may have seduced you into believing that you actually know where your time really goes. 
This short article from HBR shares a simple technique that used for a few minutes each day may ultimately save you months, perhaps years. The late great Peter Drucker also recommended this exercise for senior leaders in his wonderful book “The Effective Executive”.  Once you try it, you’ll realize the truth of another great adage, slightly modified; if you don’t measure it, you won’t manage it.
Days of Disruption (No. 4): The Truly World Wide Web, at last
Most of us have heard of Moore’s law, named after legendary Intel founder Gordon Moore who predicted, correctly, decades ago that microprocessor speeds would double every 18 months and be accompanied by a halving of costs.  Equally impressive is the progress that has been made in the speed of communication between computers.   In recent years, this standard has gone from 3G to 4G (which brought us smartphones and e-commerce) and soon, 5G.
In a recent blog posting Peter Diamandis (founder of the XPrize foundation) writes of the jump from 3G to 4G that  if you thought that was big, think again.  With plans for wide-scale deployment in 2020, 5G will be 100X faster than 4G, and 10X faster than your average broadband connection.”   Perhaps more important, 5G will enable the entire population of the world to be connected to the interneta truly world wide web, at last
“Diamandis predicts  “And as the population of online users doubles, we’re about to witness perhaps the most historic acceleration of progress and technological innovation known to man.”  Learn more about the implications for you and your business in his short blog posting “Connecting  8 billion by 2024.   


Econ Recon:
Even the Bear Must Eat:   Before the fall of the Soviet Union, the London Times described it as a “third world country with first world weapons.”  Thirty years later, how much has really changed?  Those who fear Russia’s aggressiveness and military might under Putin would do well to remember that an economy is required to “feed the bear.” 
When one looks closely at Russia, it is not only a demographic basket case with early mortality and a plummeting birth rate, it has a very tiny economy in both absolute and relative terms compared to the US.   Brian Beaulieu of ITR economics shares an eye-opening graphic of the relative sizes of national economies and offers ten reasons why there is no equivalency between Russia and the US.    It may change your view of the dynamic between the two countries.


July Insights

cid:263282E2-8B13-4DA9-9AC0-28A8EDD683DB
Week of July 2, 2018
Livermore | Red, White & Boom July 4th Fireworks & Block Party | 2016
Happy Fourth of July!
When the people fear the government, there is tyranny.
When the government fears the people, there is liberty.”
Thomas Jefferson
***
“Freedom is nothing but a chance to be better.”
Albert Camus
***
My father described this tall lady who stands in the middle of the
New York harbor, holding high a torch to welcome people
seeking freedom in America. I instantly fell in love.”
Yakov Smirnoff
Russian born American Comic
FOR YOUR EDIFICATION AND ENTERTAINMENT
The Jerk Fallacy
Independence in Real Time
Five From the Marines
Days of Disruption (No. 2):  Meet Zander Futernick
Econ Recon:  Unintended Consequences
The Jerk Fallacy
It’s said “nice guys finish last.”  Put differently, you need to be a “not nice” person to prevail in life and business.     Marketing and management guru Seth Godin suggests a more nuanced view that he calls the “The Jerk Fallacy.”     Read it and ask yourself the reason for your success
Independence in Real Time
The introduction of the telegraph in the 1830s made news available instantaneously.  Until its invention, news could only travel as fast as a horseman or ship could carry it. 
Were the Declaration of Independence to signed today, the announcement would be shared everywhere at once (assuming of course it hadn’t been leaked first).  This graphic from Smithsonian Magazine tracks how the news of independence made it across the United States in 1776.
                                                                                                            
Five from the Marines
Looking for a short course in leadership?  The United States Marine Corps has been training leaders for nearly as long as there has been a United States for them to defend.  One former Marine Officer (and Vistage Chair) shares his personal take on Five Leadership Lessons from the United State Marine Corps.
Days of Disruption (No. 2):  Meet Zander Futernick
Meet 21 year old Zander Futernick who may be about to teach the airline industry how to run, well, an airline.   Existing businesses are often reinvented by finding an unserved market and/or creating a different business model for an old product.   This short article from Forbes relates how Mr. Futernick is exploiting the market space between commercial air travel and luxury private jets.   
Step one,  he says,  is “getting rid of commercial airports”  That’s REAL disruption. (Let’s hope he succeeds).   
Econ Recon

 

Unintended consequences:  It’s often said that the “road to hell is paved with good intentions.”  To wit, Harley Davidson’s response to the new tariff policy.   Find out why the economists at ITR Economics think the impact on the iconic motorcycle maker should be filed under “Unintended Consequences.”